Virtual Intergroup Contact: How Visual Identifiability and Common Group Identity Cues Influence Prejudice Toward Latinos in Virtual Interactions

Salvador Alvídrez

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Though there is abundant evidence of how intergroup contact reduces prejudice in offline interactions, there is mixed evidence in regards to how computer-mediated mediated communication reduces intergroup prejudice. This study explores how customizing avatars to look like the self or like another person when in the presence or absence of group identity cues affects social distance toward Latinos in virtual environment (VE) interactions. Conversing with a Latinos in VE reduced social distance relative to pre-VE interaction scores. In addition, self customization increased similarity identification with one’s virtual self and, additionally, it reduced social distance toward Latinos relative to virtual other customization. In contrast, other customization in the absence of common group identity cues comparatively decreased embodied presence. The results were in line with the social identity model of deindividuation effects and provide initial evidence for how visual identifiability enhances VE intergroup contact.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventInternational Communication Association’s 68th Annual Conference: Voices - Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic
Duration: 24 May 201828 May 2018
Conference number: 68
https://www.icahdq.org/page/PastFuture

Conference

ConferenceInternational Communication Association’s 68th Annual Conference
CountryCzech Republic
CityPrague
Period24/5/1828/5/18
Internet address

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Virtual Intergroup Contact: How Visual Identifiability and Common Group Identity Cues Influence Prejudice Toward Latinos in Virtual Interactions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this