Synergistic nanomedicine: Passive, active, and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery in cancer treatment

Francisco González Salazar, Javier Vargas-Villarreal, Claudio Cabral-Romero, Jesús Norberto Garza González, Magda Elizabeth Hernández-García, Osvelia E. Rodríguez-Luis, Rene Hernández-Delgadillo, Nayely Pineda-Aguilar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanocarriers are heavily researched as drug delivery vehicles capable of sequestering antineoplastic agents and then releasing their contents at the desired location. The feasibility of using such carriers stems from their ability to produce a multimodel delivery system whereby passive, ligand and triggered targeting can be applied in the fight against cancer. Passive targeting capitalizes on the leaky nature of tumor tissue which allows for the extravasation of particles with a size smaller than 0.5 μm into the tumors. Ligand targeting utilizes the concept of receptor-mediated endocytosis and involves the conjugation of ligands onto the surface of nanoparticles, while triggered targeting involves the use of external and internal stimuli to release the carriers contents upon reaching the diseased location. In this review, micelles and liposomes have been considered due to the promising results they have shown in vivo and in vitro and their potential for advancements into clinical trials. Thus, this review focuses on the most recent advancements in the field of micellar and liposomal drug delivery and considers the synergistic effect of passive- and ligand-targeting strategies, and the use of ultrasound in triggering drug release at the tumor site.

Original languageEnglish
Article number16
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

Fingerprint

Medical nanotechnology
Oncology
Drug delivery
delivery
drugs
Ultrasonics
cancer
Ligands
Tumors
ligands
tumors
Liposomes
Micelles
releasing
conjugation
stems
Antineoplastic Agents
stimuli
micelles
vehicles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

González Salazar, Francisco ; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier ; Cabral-Romero, Claudio ; Garza González, Jesús Norberto ; Hernández-García, Magda Elizabeth ; Rodríguez-Luis, Osvelia E. ; Hernández-Delgadillo, Rene ; Pineda-Aguilar, Nayely. / Synergistic nanomedicine : Passive, active, and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery in cancer treatment. In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. 2016 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 1-18.
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González Salazar, F, Vargas-Villarreal, J, Cabral-Romero, C, Garza González, JN, Hernández-García, ME, Rodríguez-Luis, OE, Hernández-Delgadillo, R & Pineda-Aguilar, N 2016, 'Synergistic nanomedicine: Passive, active, and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery in cancer treatment', Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, vol. 16, no. 1, 16, pp. 1-18. https://doi.org/10.1166/jnn.2016.11124

Synergistic nanomedicine : Passive, active, and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery in cancer treatment. / González Salazar, Francisco; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Cabral-Romero, Claudio; Garza González, Jesús Norberto; Hernández-García, Magda Elizabeth; Rodríguez-Luis, Osvelia E.; Hernández-Delgadillo, Rene; Pineda-Aguilar, Nayely.

In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Vol. 16, No. 1, 16, 01.01.2016, p. 1-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T2 - Passive, active, and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery in cancer treatment

AU - González Salazar, Francisco

AU - Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

AU - Cabral-Romero, Claudio

AU - Garza González, Jesús Norberto

AU - Hernández-García, Magda Elizabeth

AU - Rodríguez-Luis, Osvelia E.

AU - Hernández-Delgadillo, Rene

AU - Pineda-Aguilar, Nayely

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Nanocarriers are heavily researched as drug delivery vehicles capable of sequestering antineoplastic agents and then releasing their contents at the desired location. The feasibility of using such carriers stems from their ability to produce a multimodel delivery system whereby passive, ligand and triggered targeting can be applied in the fight against cancer. Passive targeting capitalizes on the leaky nature of tumor tissue which allows for the extravasation of particles with a size smaller than 0.5 μm into the tumors. Ligand targeting utilizes the concept of receptor-mediated endocytosis and involves the conjugation of ligands onto the surface of nanoparticles, while triggered targeting involves the use of external and internal stimuli to release the carriers contents upon reaching the diseased location. In this review, micelles and liposomes have been considered due to the promising results they have shown in vivo and in vitro and their potential for advancements into clinical trials. Thus, this review focuses on the most recent advancements in the field of micellar and liposomal drug delivery and considers the synergistic effect of passive- and ligand-targeting strategies, and the use of ultrasound in triggering drug release at the tumor site.

AB - Nanocarriers are heavily researched as drug delivery vehicles capable of sequestering antineoplastic agents and then releasing their contents at the desired location. The feasibility of using such carriers stems from their ability to produce a multimodel delivery system whereby passive, ligand and triggered targeting can be applied in the fight against cancer. Passive targeting capitalizes on the leaky nature of tumor tissue which allows for the extravasation of particles with a size smaller than 0.5 μm into the tumors. Ligand targeting utilizes the concept of receptor-mediated endocytosis and involves the conjugation of ligands onto the surface of nanoparticles, while triggered targeting involves the use of external and internal stimuli to release the carriers contents upon reaching the diseased location. In this review, micelles and liposomes have been considered due to the promising results they have shown in vivo and in vitro and their potential for advancements into clinical trials. Thus, this review focuses on the most recent advancements in the field of micellar and liposomal drug delivery and considers the synergistic effect of passive- and ligand-targeting strategies, and the use of ultrasound in triggering drug release at the tumor site.

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