Regional entrepreneurial ecosystems in Mexico: a comparative analysis

Allan Oswaldo Villegas Mateos, José Ernesto Amorós

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The entrepreneurial ecosystem approach tries to understand the mechanisms underlying new business creation and helps develop tools, governmental policies and support systems that enhance the outcomes of entrepreneurship activities. To ensure a better understanding of those mechanisms, this study aims to contrast regional policies in emerging economies that are designed to foster local new business creation and development. Design/methodology/approach: One of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor’s surveys, the National Experts’ Survey, was applied to a sample of N = 675 key informants in Mexico at ten entities, seven of whom were categorized as non-centrally located. The authors used non-parametric statistics to compare the differences between centrally and non-centrally located experts. Findings: The main results indicate that non-centrally located experts perceive their regions to be in a worse position than centrally located experts in terms of government policies regulation, post-school education and commercial and physical infrastructure, but surprisingly in a better position regarding financial access, general government policy, government programs, primary and secondary education, R&D transfer, market dynamism and openness and cultural and social norms. Practical implications: These findings have policy implications for all levels of government in Mexico, which must prioritize the homologation of opportunities for people in both large and small cities. Originality/value: The replication of a Chilean study contributes to the empirical literature of regional entrepreneurial ecosystems in emerging economies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)576-597
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Nov 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Comparative analysis
Mexico
Ecosystem
New business
Government
Government policy
Emerging economies
Ecosystem approach
Replication
Primary education
Design methodology
Global Entrepreneurship Monitor
Dynamism
Nonparametric statistics
Regional policy
Entrepreneurship
Policy implications
Openness
Education
Social norms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

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Regional entrepreneurial ecosystems in Mexico: a comparative analysis. / Villegas Mateos, Allan Oswaldo; Amorós, José Ernesto.

In: Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, Vol. 11, No. 4, 04.11.2019, p. 576-597.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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