Ocular toxoplasmosis: Clinical characteristics in pediatric patients

Manuel Garza-Leon, Lourdes Arellanes Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the clinical features of Ocular Toxoplasmosis in pediatric patients. Methods: A retrospective, non-comparative series of cases was studied. We reviewed the clinical records of patients 16 year old or younger diagnosed with Ocular Toxoplasmosis. Results: Forty patients (56 eyes) were included. The mean age was 9.5 yrs old. Twenty were female. Unilateral involvement was noticed in 60% of patients. The most common symptoms were strabismus (32.1%) and reduced VA in (23.2%). An inactive retinal scar was observed in most cases (71.4%). Panuveitis was found in 8 eyes (14.2%), and posterior uveitis in 7 eyes of 7 patients (12.5%); one eye presented neuroretinitis. The most frequent location of retinochoroidal lesions was the posterior pole (72.7%). Conclusions: In children, ocular toxoplasmosis is most commonly diagnosed during the inactive stage. When inflammation is present, it can be severe and frequently associated with other complications such vasculitis and papillitis. © 2012 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-138
Number of pages9
JournalOcular Immunology and Inflammation
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ocular Toxoplasmosis
Pediatrics
Panuveitis
Posterior Uveitis
Retinitis
Papilledema
Strabismus
Vasculitis
Cicatrix
Inflammation
Delivery of Health Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

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Ocular toxoplasmosis: Clinical characteristics in pediatric patients. / Garza-Leon, Manuel; Arellanes Garcia, Lourdes.

In: Ocular Immunology and Inflammation, 01.04.2012, p. 130-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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