An Introduction to the Transference Unconscious

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper explores the evolving definition of the term ‘unconscious’ in late twentieth century French psychoanalysis: structuralist, real, and enunciative. Each hypothetic definition of the unconscious employs a rather different reading of Freud’s discovery of the divided nature of subjective reality, adopting different approaches to the question of trace permanence and strangeness. The paper argues that an assessment of the sequence of Lacanian theories of the unconscious should be understood against the backdrop of discontinuous progress as conceptualised by French historical epistemology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-65
Number of pages33
JournalLanguage and Psychoanalysis
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Cite this

@article{9e863b1e2f8a4950807c41254b7b56f0,
title = "An Introduction to the Transference Unconscious",
abstract = "This paper explores the evolving definition of the term ‘unconscious’ in late twentieth century French psychoanalysis: structuralist, real, and enunciative. Each hypothetic definition of the unconscious employs a rather different reading of Freud’s discovery of the divided nature of subjective reality, adopting different approaches to the question of trace permanence and strangeness. The paper argues that an assessment of the sequence of Lacanian theories of the unconscious should be understood against the backdrop of discontinuous progress as conceptualised by French historical epistemology.",
author = "David Hafner",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.7565/landp.v6i1.1566",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "33--65",
journal = "Language and Psychoanalysis",
issn = "2049-324X",
publisher = "University of Edinburgh",
number = "1",

}

An Introduction to the Transference Unconscious. / Hafner, David.

In: Language and Psychoanalysis, Vol. 6, No. 1, 2017, p. 33-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - An Introduction to the Transference Unconscious

AU - Hafner, David

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - This paper explores the evolving definition of the term ‘unconscious’ in late twentieth century French psychoanalysis: structuralist, real, and enunciative. Each hypothetic definition of the unconscious employs a rather different reading of Freud’s discovery of the divided nature of subjective reality, adopting different approaches to the question of trace permanence and strangeness. The paper argues that an assessment of the sequence of Lacanian theories of the unconscious should be understood against the backdrop of discontinuous progress as conceptualised by French historical epistemology.

AB - This paper explores the evolving definition of the term ‘unconscious’ in late twentieth century French psychoanalysis: structuralist, real, and enunciative. Each hypothetic definition of the unconscious employs a rather different reading of Freud’s discovery of the divided nature of subjective reality, adopting different approaches to the question of trace permanence and strangeness. The paper argues that an assessment of the sequence of Lacanian theories of the unconscious should be understood against the backdrop of discontinuous progress as conceptualised by French historical epistemology.

U2 - 10.7565/landp.v6i1.1566

DO - 10.7565/landp.v6i1.1566

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 33

EP - 65

JO - Language and Psychoanalysis

JF - Language and Psychoanalysis

SN - 2049-324X

IS - 1

ER -